MARXIST INTERNET ARCHIVE |  MAO


Mao Tse-tung

ON THE
TEN MAJOR
RELATIONSHIPS


From the
Selected Works of Mao Tse-tung,
Foreign Languages Press
Peking 1977

First Edition 1977

Vol. V, pp. 284-307.


Prepared © for the Internet by David J. Romagnolo, djr@cruzio.com (July 1997)


C O N T E N T S

ON THE TEN MAJOR RELATIONSHIPS
284

I.
 
II.
 
III.
 
IV.
 
V.
 
VI.
 
VII.
 VIII.
 
IX.
X.

The Relationship Between Heavy Industry on the One Hand and Light Industry on the Other
The Relationship Between Industry in the Coastal Regions and Industry in the Interior
The Relationship Between Economic Construction and Defense Construction
The Relationship Between the State, the Units of Production and the Producers
The Relationship Between the Central and the Local Authorities
The Relationship Between the Han Nationality and the Minority Nationalities
The Relationship Between Party and Non-Party
The Relationship Between Revolution and Counter-
Revolution
The Relationship Between Right and Wrong
The Relationship Between China and Other Countries


285
 
286
 
288
 
289
 
292
 
295
296
 
298
301
303

NOTES





From Marx
to Mao

Mao
Collection

Reading
Guide

Notes on
the Text
Below



    page 307


    NOTES

      [1] The system of fixed quotas for the production, purchase and marketing of grain was instituted in the spring of 1955. The quotas for production fixed in that year were based on the grain yield per mou in normal years, and increases in production were not to entail extra sales of grain to the state for three years. The fixed quota for purchase refers to the purchase by the state of a fixed proportion of surplus grain from peasant households having a surplus. The fixed quota for marketing refers to the quota for the state's supply of grain to grain-deficient households. The system was adopted in order to raise the peasants' enthusiasm for increasing production.    [p.291]

      [2] The system of obligatory sales enforced in the Soviet Union from 1933 to 1957 was the principal measure by which the state bought agricultural products. Under it the collective farms and individual peasant households were required to sell their agricultural products annually to the state in quantities and at prices fixed by the state.    [p.291]

      [3] In the Peking opera The Famen Temple, Chia Kuei is a trusted lackey of Liu Chin, a Ming Dynasty eunuch.    [p.305]