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Mao Tse-tung

PROBLEMS OF STRATEGY IN
GUERRILLA WAR AGAINST JAPAN


From the
Selected Works of Mao Tse-tung
Foreign Languages Press
Peking 1967

First Edition 1965
Second Printing 1967

Vol. II, pp. 79-112.


Prepared © for the Internet by David J. Romagnolo, djr@cruzio.com (June 1997)


C O N T E N T S

Chapter I
Why Raise the Question of Strategy in Guerrilla War?

 
79

Chapter II
The Basic Principle of War is to Preserve Oneself and
Destroy the Enemy


 
81

Chapter III
Six Specific Problems in Guerrilla War Against Japan


82

Chapter IV
Initiative, Flexibility and Planning in Conducting Offensives
  Within the Defensive, Battles of Quick Decision Within
  Protracted War, and Exterior-Line Operations Within
  Interior-Line Operations


 
 
 
83

Chapter V
Co-ordination with Regular Warfare

 
91

Chapter VI
The Establishment of Base Areas

 
93

  1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

The Types of Base Areas
Guerrilla Zones and Base Zones
Conditions for Establishing Base Areas
The Consolidation and Expansion of Base Areas
Forms in Which We and the Enemy Encircle One Another

94
96
98
100
101

Chapter VII
The Strategic Defensive and the Strategic Offensive in
  Guerrilla War


 
102

1.
2.

The Strategic Defensive in Guerrilla War
The Strategic Offensive in Guerrilla War

103
105

Chapter VIII
Development of Guerrilla War into Mobile War

 
107

Chapter IX
The Relationship of Command


109

NOTES

111





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    page 111


    NOTES

      [1] The Changpai mountain range is situated on the northeastern border of China. After the Japancse invasion on September 18, 1931, the region became a base area for the anti-Japanae guerrillas led by thc Chinese Communist Party.    [p.94]

    page 112

      [2] The Wutai mountain range is situated on the borders between Shansi, Hopei and what was then Chahar Province. In October 1937 the Eighth Route Army led by the Chinese Communist Party started building the Shansi-Chahar-Hopei anti-Japanese base area with the Wutai mountain region as its centre.    [p.91]

      [3] The Taihang mountain range is situated on the borders between Shansi, Hopei and Honan Provinces. In November 1937 the Eighth Route Army started building the southeastern Shansi anti-Japanese base area with the Taihang mountain region as its centre.    [p.91]

      [4] The Taishan Mountain is one of the chief peaks of the Tai-Yi mountain range in central Shantung. In the winter of 1937 the guerrilla forces led by the Communist Party started building the central Shantung anti-Japanese base area with the Tai-Yi mountain region as its centre.    [p.91]

      [5] The Yenshan mountain range is situated on the border of Hopei and what was then Jehol Province. In the summer of 1938 the Eighth Route Army started building the eastern Hopei anti-Japanese base area with the Yenshan mountain region as its centre.    [p.91]

      [6] The Maoshan Mountains are in southern Kiangsu. In June 1938 the New Fourth Army led by the Communist Party started building the southern Kiangsu anti-Japanese base area with the Maoshan mountain tegion as its centre.    [p.91]

      [7] Experience gained in the War of Resistance proved that it was possible to establish long-term and, in many places, stable base areas in the plains. This was due to their vastness and big populations, the correctness of the Communist Party's policies, the extensive mobilization of the people and the enemy's shortage of troops. Comrade Mao Tse-tung affirmed this possibility more definitely in later directives.    [p.95]

      [8] Ever since the end of World War II, the national and democratic revolutionary movement has been surging forward in Asia, Africa and Latin America. In many countries the people, led by their own revolutionary and progressive forces, have carried on sustained armed struggles to overthrow the dark rule of imperialism and reaction. This demonstrates that in the new historical circumstances -- when the socialist camp, the revolutionary forces of the people in the colonial countries and the forces of the people striving for democracy and progress in all countries are taking giant strides forward, when the world capitalist system is weakening still further, and when the colonial rule of imperialism is heading for disintegration -- the conditions under which the people of various countries conduct guerrilla warfare today need not be quite the same as those which were necessary in the days of the guerrilla warfare waged by the Chinese people against Japan. In other words, guerrilla war can be victoriously waged in a country which is not large in territory, as for instance, in Cuba, Algeria, Laos and southern Viet Nam.    [p.99]

      [9] Weichi is an old Chinese game, in which the two players try to encircle each other's pieces on the board. When a player's pieces are encirded, they are counted as "dead" (captured). But if there is a sufficient number of blank spaces among the encircled pieces, then the latter are still "alive" (not captured).    [p.102]

      [10] In 353 B.C. the state of Wei laid siege to Hantan, capital of the state of Chao. The king of the state of Chi, an ally of Chao, ordered his generals Tien Chi and Sun Pin to aid Chao with their troops. Knowing that the crack forces of Wei had entered Chao and left their own territory weakly garrisoned, General Sun Pin attacked the state of Wei whose troops withdrew to defend their own country. Taking advantage of their exhaustion, the troops of Chi engaged and routed them at Kueiling (northeast of the present Hotse County in Shantung). The siege of Hantan, capital of Chao, was thus lifted. Since then Chinese strategists have referred to similar tactics as "relieving the state of Chao by besieging the state of Wei".    [p.104]