MARXIST INTERNET ARCHIVE



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The anti-Communists attack

All the anti-Party and counter-revolutionary elements tried to change the criticism of the excesses into a criticism of Stalin and the Party leadership. Alternately attacking the Leninist  leadership with right-wing and `leftist' arguments, they tried to put forward anti-Communist positions.

During a meeting of the Timiryazev  Agriculture Academy in Moscow, a man cried out, `Where was the CC during the excesses?' A Pravda editorial dated May 27 `condemned as `demagogy' all attempts to `discredit the Leninist  leadership of the party' '.

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Ibid. , pp. 322--323.

A man named Mamaev,  during a discussion period, wrote: `the question involuntarily arises --- whose head got dizzy? ... one should speak about one's own disease, not teach the lower party masses about it'. Mamaev  denounced `the mass application of repressive measures to the middle and poor peasants'. The countryside would only be ready for collectivization when mechanization was possible. He then criticized the `comprehensive bureaucratisation' in the party and condemned the `artificial inflaming of the class struggle'. Mamaev  was correctly denounced as `an agent of the kulaks within the party'.

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Ibid. , pp. 325--327.

Expelled from the Soviet Union, Trotsky  systematically chose positions opposed to those taken by the Party. In February 1930, he denounced the accelerated collectivization and dekulakization as a `bureaucratic adventure'. Attempting to establish socialism in one country, based on the equipment of a backward peasant, is doomed to failure, he cried out. `In March, he condemned Stalin for failing to admit that the `utopian reactionary character of ``100 per cent collectivisation'' ' lay in `the compulsory organisation of huge collective farms without the technological basis that could alone insure their superiority over small ones' '. He asserted that the kolkhozy `will fall apart while waiting for the technical base'.

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Ibid. , pp. 327--328.

Trotsky's  `leftist' criticisms were no longer distinguishable from those of the right opportunists.

Rakovsky,  the main Trotskyist  who remained in the Soviet Union, in internal exile, called for the overthrow of the `centrist leadership' headed by Stalin. The kolkhozians would explode and would constitute one front of the campaign against the socialist state. The kulak should not be discouraged from producing by limiting his means. Industrial products should be imported for the peasants and the Soviet industrialization program should be slowed down. Rakovsky  recognized that his propositions resembled those of the right-wing, but `the distinction between ourselves and the Rights is the distinction between an army retreating in order and deserters fleeing from the battlefield'.

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Ibid. , pp. 335--336.



next up previous contents index
Next: Retreats and advances Up: `Dizzy with success' Previous: Right opportunism rears



Fri Aug 25 09:03:42 PDT 1995