MARXIST INTERNET ARCHIVE |  V. I. Lenin


V. I. Lenin

TENTH ALL-RUSSIAN
CONFERENCE OF THE R.C.P.(B.)

May 26-28, 1921

Published in Byulleten Vserossiiskoi     
Konferentsii R.K.P.
( Bolshevikov)     
( Bullitin of the All-Russia     
Conference of the R.C.P.
[ B.] )     
Nos. 1 and 2,     
May 27 and 28, 1921     

Published according
to the Byulleten text
 
 
 
 

From V. I. Lenin, Collected Works, 4th English Edition,
Progress Publishers, Moscow, 1965

Vol. 32, pp. 399-437.

Translated from the Russian
Edited by Yuri Sdobnikov


Prepared © for the Internet by David J. Romagnolo, djr@cruzio.com (September 1997)


TENTH ALL-RUSSIAN CONFERENCE OF THE R.C.P.(B.)[115]
    May 26-28, 1921   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .


399

  1.

SPEECH IN OPENING THE CONFERENCE, MAY 26   .   .

401

2.

REPORT ON THE TAX IN KIND, MAY 26  .   .   .   .   .

402

3.

SUMMING-UP SPEECH ON THE TAX IN KIND, MAY 27 .

417

4.
 

DRAFT RESOLUTION ON QUESTIONS OF THE NEW
ECONOMIC POLICY .  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .


433

5.

SPEECH IN CLOSING THE CONFERENCE, MAY 28   .   .

436

NOTES




    page 558


    NOTES

      [115] An extraordinary conference, held in Moscow from May 26 to 28, 1921, was attended by 239 delegates from Party and Soviet organisations. On its agenda were the following questions: 1) Economic policy: a) tax in kind; b) co-operatives; c) financial reform; d) small industry; 2) The current role of the Socialist-Revolutionaries and Mensheviks, 3) The Third Congress of the Comintern; 4) Information on the Fourth Trade Union Congress; 5) Organisational question.
        The Conference centred on the question of the New Economic Policy (NEP) because it was not yet clear enough to the people in the localities.
        Lenin guided the work of the Conference: he delivered the opening speech, spoke on the agenda, was elected to the Presidium, gave a report and a summing-up speech on the tax in kind, and the closing speech of the Conference. Substantiating the New Economic Policy, he exposed the false rumours about NEP and distortions of this policy, and stressed that it was a policy whose aim was the construction of a socialist society, that it was to be carried out "in earnest and for a long time". The Conference adopted Lenin's draft resolution, "On Economic Policy", which confirmed NEP's basic principles and gave concrete instructions for their implementation. It said: "The basic political task of the moment is for all Party and Soviet workers to master and implement to the letter the New Economic Policy. See K.P.S.S. v rezolutsiakh . . . (The C.P.S.U. in the Resolutions and Decisions of Congresses, Conferences and C.C. Plenary Meetings, Part 1, 1954, p. 574).
        After the Conference had heard information on the work of the Fourth Trade Union Congress, Lenin sharply criticised the factional activity of the trade union leadership, first and foremost M. P. Tomsky, Chairman of the All-Russia Central Council of Trade Unions.
        Another question of great importance was the organisational work of the Party, the report on which was given by V. M. Molotov. The Conference adopted a "Plan for the Work of the Central Committee of the R.C.P.(B.)" which demanded the training and promotion of new Party workers and activisation of all Party and Soviet work. Lenin stressed that Party organisations had to establish closer ties with the non-Party masses and that it was necessary to collect and study the experience of local Party organisations. His remarks were taken into account in the resolution.
        Representatives of the Communist Parties of Germany and the United States conveyed greetings to the Conference, and, on the motion of the Presidium, the Conference cabled a message of greetings to workers detained in prison.    [p.399]

      [116] The reference is to the Fourth All-Russia Congress of Trade Unions, held in Moscow from May 17 to 25, 1921, and the Fourth All-Russia Congress of Economic Councils, held there from May 18 to 24, 1921.
        The Fourth Congress of Trade Unions had the following items on its agenda: report of the All-Russia Central Council of Trade

    page 559

    Unions; report of the Presidium of the Supreme Economic Council the role and tasks of the trade unions and economic development organisational question; wage-rate policy and workers' supply; trade unions and co-operatives; labour protection, etc.
        The Fourth Congress of Economic Councils had on its agenda: report of the Presidium of the Supreme Economic Council, economic policy of the S.E.C. in connection with the decree on the tax in kind and the co-operatives, S.E.C. organisation, report of the State Planning Commission; report on foreign trade; electrification of Russia; material resources of the Republic and organisation of supply in industry.
        The most important questions were discussed at joint sittings of the two congresses with the participation of specialists and public figures.    [p.415]

      [117] Colonel of the gendarmerie Zubatov, Chief of the Secret Political Police, proposed the setting up of legal workers' organisations in 1901-03 to divert the workers from political struggle against the tsarist autocracy, and to switch their attention to narrow economic demands which the government, he asserted, was ready to meet. The Minister for the Interior, V. K. Plehve, approved Zubatov's activity and the first organisation, called "Workers' mutual aid in mechanical industries society", was set up in Moscow in May 1901, and later such societies made their appearance in Minsk, Odessa, Vilno, Kiev, and other towns.
        The Second Coneress of the R.S.D.L.P., in its resolution "On the Trade Union Struggle", defined Zubatovism as a policy of "systematic betrayal of working class interests for the benefit of the capitalists", and in order to fight it, called on Party organisations to support and lead any strikes started by legal workers' organisations.
        Revolutionary Social-Democrats made use of such organisations to draw the masses of working people into the struggle against the tsarist government, exposing the reactionary nature of Zubatov's policy. Lenin wrote in 1905: "And now the Zubatov movement is outgrowing its bounds. Initiated by the police in the interests of the police, in the interests of supporting the autocracy and demoralising the political consciousness of the workers, this movement is turning against the autocracy and is becoming an outbreak of the proletarian class struggle."
        The tsarist government had to close down the Zubatov organisations in 1903 because of the mounting revolutionary movement.    [p.417]