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V. I. Lenin

THE RESULTS OF SIX MONTHS' WORK


 

Written on July 12-14 (25-27), 1912
 
Published in Pravda Nos. 78, 79, 80, 81.
July 29 and 31, and August 1 and 2, 1912
Signed: A Statistician


Published according to
the newspaper text 
 
 
 


From V. I. Lenin, Collected Works, 4th English Edition,
Progress Publishers, Moscow, 1968

First printing 1963
Second printing 1968

Vol. 18, pp. 187-202.

Translated from the Russian by Stepan Apresyan
Edited by Clemens Dutt


Prepared © for the Internet by David J. Romagnolo,
djr@marx2mao.org
 (May 2002)

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NOTES





page 624


NOTES

  [101] The article "The Results of Six Months' Work " was written in the first half of July 1912. Lenin's correspondence with Pravda concerning the publication of this article survived. In one of his letters to Pravda, Lenin asked the editors to print the article in four instalments, as separate feature articles, and agreed only to corrections made for censorship reasons. The article was published in the form suggested by Lenin.    [p. 187]

  [102] Lenin is referring to the Menshevik liquidators' threat to nominate their own candidates at the Fourth Duma election for the worker curia as a counter to the Bolshevik candidates.    [p. 197]

  [103] Appeal to Reason -- a newspaper published by the American Socialists, founded in Girard, Kansas, in 1895. It had no official connection with the American Socialist Party but propagated socialist ideas and was very popular among the workers. Among those who wrote for it was Eugene Debs.    [p. 201]

 
page 625

  [104] Gazeta-Kopeika (Kopek Newspaper) -- a bourgeois daily of the yellow press type, published in St. Petersburg from 1908. It was closed down in 1918.    [p. 202]