MARXIST INTERNET ARCHIVE |  V. I. Lenin

V. I. Lenin

ON THE QUESTION OF
OUR FACTORY STATISTICS

( Professor Karyshev's New Statistical Exploits )

Written in August 1898
 
Published in 1898 in the collection,
Economic Studies and Essays,
by Vladimir Ilyin

Published according to
the text in the collection
 
 
 

From V. I. Lenin, Collected Works, 4th English Edition,
Progress Publishers, Moscow, 1972,

First printing 1960
Second printing 1964
Third printing 1972

Vol. 4, pp. 13-45.

Translated by Joe Fineberg and by George Hanna
Edited by Victor Jerome


Prepared © for the Internet by David J. Romagnolo, djr@cruzio.com (November 1997)

see footnote[*]

1879

1890

1894-95

Number of

Value of
output
(thous.
rubles)

Number of

Value of
output
(thous.
rubles)

Number of

Value of
output
(thous.
rubles)

Factor-
ies

Workers

Factor-
ies

Workers

Factor-
ies

Workers


All "factories"
 
Establishments with
100 or more workers
 


27,986
 
 
1,238
 


763,152
 
 
509,643
 


1,148,134
 
 
629,926
 


21,124
 
 
1,431
 


875,764
 
 
623,146
 


1,500,871
 
 
858,588
 


14,578
 
 
1,468
 


885,555
 
 
655,670
 


1,345,346
 
 
955,233
 

Percentage of total

--

66.8

54.8

--

71.1

57.2

--

74

70.8

  * The same sources. Some data for 1879, as already mentioned, have been added approximately. The general data of the Directory and the List are incomparable with each other, but here we compare only percentages of the total number of workers and of the total value of output, and these data in their totals are much more reliable (as we shall show later) than the data on the total number of factories. The estimate of large establishments is taken from Capitalism in Russia, which the present writer is preparing for print.[5]


page 431


NOTES

  [1] The article, "On the Question of Our Factory Statistics (Professor Karyshev's New Statistical Exploits)," was written in August 1898 and published in the collection Economic Studies and Essays that appeared early in October 1898. Lenin made extensive use of the material and the conclusions of this article for his The Development of Capitalism in Russia (Chapter V, "The First Stages of Captalism in Industry"; Chapter VI, "Capitalist Manufacture and Capitalist Domestic Industry"; and Chapter VII, "The Development of Large-Scale Machine Industry," Section II, "Our Factory Statistics").    [p.13]

  [2] Russkiye Vedomosti (Russian Recorder ) -- a newspaper published in Moscow from 1863 onwards, it expressed the views of the moderate liberal intelligentsia. Among its contributors in the 1880s and 1890s were the democratic writers V G. Korolenko, M. Y. Saltykov-Shchedrin, and G. I. Uspensky. It also published items written by liberal Narodniks. In 1905 it became the organ of the Right wing of the Constitutional-Democratic (Cadet) Party. Lenin said that Russkiye Vedomosti was a peculiar combination of "Right-wing Cadetism and a strain of Narodism" (see present edition, Vol. 19, "Frank Speeches of a Liberal"). In 1918 the publication was closed down together with other counter-revolution ary newspapers.    [p.17]

  [3] Yuridichesky Vestnik (The Legal Messenger ) -- a monthly magazine, bourgeois-liberal in trend, published in Moscow from 1867 to 1892.    [p.24]

  [4] Mir Bozhy (The Wide World ; literally, God's World ) -- a monthly literary and popular-scientific magazine, liberal in trend, it was published in St. Petersburg from 1892 to 1906. In 1898 the magazine carried Lenin's review of A. Bogdanov's A Short Course of Economic Science (see p. 46 of this volume). From 1906 to 1918 the magazine appeared under the title Sovremenny Mir (Contemporary World ).    [p.27]

  [5] The reference is to Lenin's The Development of Capitalism in Russia (see present edition, Vol. 3).    [p.28]

page 432

  [6] Zemstvo -- the name given to the local government bodies introduced in the central gubernias of tsarist Russia in 1864.
    The powers of the Zemstvos were limited to purely local economic problems (hospital and road building, statistics, insurance, etc.). Their activities were controlled by the provincial governors and by the Ministry of Internal Affairs, which could overrule any decisions disapproved by the government.    [p.36]

  [7] The results of the first general census of the population of the Russian Empire, taken on January 28 (February 9), 1897, were published as a series between 1897 and 1905; in the second edition of his The Development of Capitalism in Russia Lenin made use of them, correcting the data on the population of a number of places.    [p.41]

  [8] Narodism -- a petty-bourgeois trend in the Russian revolutionary movement; it began to manifest itself in the sixties and seventies of the nineteenth century and comprised mainly progressive intellectuals from the lower estates. With the objective of rousing the peasantry to struggle against absolutism, the revolutionary youth "went among the people," to the village, gaining there however, no support. The Narodniks held to the view that capitalism in Russia was a fortuitous phenomenon with no prospect of development, and that for this reason there would be no growth and development of a Russian proletariat. The Narodniks considered the peasantry to be the main revolutionary force and regarded the village commune as the embryo of socialism. The Narodniks proceeded from an erroneous view of the role of the class struggle in historical development, maintaining that history is made by heroes, by outstanding personalities, who are followed passively by the popular masses.    [p.44]