MARXIST INTERNET ARCHIVE |  V. I. Lenin


V. I. Lenin

NINTH ALL-RUSSIA CONGRESS
OF SOVIETS

December 23-28, 1921

 



From V. I. Lenin, Collected Works, 4th English Edition,
Progress Publishers, Moscow, 1966

Vol. 33, pp. 141-81.

Translated from the Russian
Edited by David Skvirsky
and George Hanna


Prepared © for the Internet by David J. Romagnolo,
djr@marx2mao.org (July 2002)

NINTH ALL-RUSSIA CONGRESS OF SOVIETS, December 23-28,
1921  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .


141

  1.
 
 

THE HOME AND FOREIGN POLICY OF THE REPUBLIC.
Report of the All-Russia Central Executive Committee
and the Council of People's Commissars
, December 23


 
143

2.
 
 

INSTRUCTIONS BY THE NINTH ALL-RUSSIA CONGRESS
OF SOVIETS ON QUESTIONS OF ECONOMIC ACTlVITIES,
December 28 .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .


 
178

NOTES



 
page 141


NINTH ALL-RUSSIA CONGRESS
OF SOVIETS

    December 23-28, 1921
[40] 


 










 

 




    page 513


    NOTES

      [40] The Ninth All-Russia Congress of Soviets sat in Moscow on December 23-28, 1921. It was attended by 1,993 delegates, of whom 1,631 had a casting vote and 362 a consultative voice.
        This Congress summed up the first results of activities under the New Economic Policy, fully approving the home and foreign policy of the workers' and peasants' government. In its "Declaration on the International Position of the R.S.F.S.R.", the Congress made the proposal to the governments of neighbouring and all other states to found their foreign policy on the principle of peaceful coexistence, on "peaceful and friendly coexistence with the Soviet republics".
        The Congress devoted its main attention to finding ways of rapidly restoring agriculture as a key condition for the development of the country's entire economy. It also gave much of its attention to famine relief, calling upon workers and peasants to bend every effort to help the people, particularly children, stricken by famine along the Volga. The Congress expressed its "warm appreciation to the workers of all countries who came to the assistance of the famine-stricken gubernias of Soviet Russia".
        The Congress decisions stated that the restoration and development of large-scale industry "is, in addition to the restoration of agriculture, the cardinal task of the Republic".
        Lenin was very active in preparing for the Congress and directed its work.

     
    page 514

        He wrote the "Instructions on Questions of Economic Management", which were adopted by the Congress, and also a number of documents on which the Congress decisions were based.
        The Congress elected a new All-Russia Central Executive Committee consisting of 386 members and 127 alternate members.    [p. 141]

      [41] This Conference on restricting naval armaments and on Pacific and Far Eastern problems was convened on the initiative of the U.S.A. It sat in Washington from November 12, 1921 to February 6, 1922 and was attended by representatives of the U.S.A. Britain, Japan, France, Italy, China, Belgium, Portugal and the Netherlands. Soviet Russia was not invited, nor was the Far Eastern Republic, which was in existence at the time. Without the Soviet Republic's participation, the Conference examined a number of problems concerning Soviet Russia. In this connection, the People's Commissariat of Foreign Affairs lodged two protests -- on July 19 and November 2, 1921 -- with the governments concerned, stating it would not recognise decisions taken by the Conference without the participation of one of the principal interested parties. On December 8, 1921, the People's Commissariat of Foreign Affairs protested against the discussion at the Washington Conference of the problem of the Chinese-Easter Railway, which solely concerned Russia and China.
        The decisions of the Conference were a supplement to the Versailles Treaty; under pressure brought to bear by the U.S.A. and Britain, Japan was compelled to relinquish some of the positions she had captured in China, but at the same time she consolidated her rule in South Manchuria.    [p. 155]

      [42] Yugostal -- a mining metallurgical trust founded in September 1921. It embraced some large iron and steel plants in the Ukraine, the Northern Caucasus and the Crimea and played an important part in rehabilitating the country's iron and steel industry. It existed until 1919.    [p. 168]

      [43] The first section (capacity -- 5,000 kw) of the State Shatura District Power Station, a project started in 1918, was commissioned on July 25, 1920. The station was completed in 1925 and was named after Lenin.

        The building of the Kashira Power Station was started in February 1919, and it was expected that it would be completed by the end of 1921, when the Ninth All-Russia Congress of Soviets was due to open. Lenin attached great importance to this station as a power source for some of the largest factories and mills in Moscow and as the first project under the electrification plan. He kept a close watch on the course of the project, directly participating in the solution of many of its problems and checking how it was being supplied with the necessary materials, manpower, fuel and equipment.

     
    page 515

        The first section (12,000 kw) of this power station became operational on June 4, 1922.    [p. 169]

      [44] The Krasny Oktyabr (formerly Utkina Zavod) Power Station was completed in 1922, its first section (10,000 kw) becoming operational on October 8, 1922.    [p. 170]

      [45] This is a reference to the trial of 35 private businessmen -- owners of tea-and-dining rooms, bakeries, shoemaking establishments, etc. -- in Moscow on December 15-18, 1921. They were charged with violating the Labour Code, namely, exploiting the labour of children, juveniles and women, lengthening the working day, and so on. Workers of large enterprises, both members and non-members of the Party, acted as prosecutors. The court sentenced ten of the accused to large fines or to forced labour without imprisonment.    [p. 171]

      [46] Lenin has in mind the fable Geese by the well-known Russian writer Ivan Krylov.    [p. 173]