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V. I. Lenin

THE IMPENDING CATASTROPHE
AND HOW TO COMBAT IT

Published at the end
of October 1917 in pamphlet
form by Priboi Publishers

Published according to
the manuscript
 

From V. I. Lenin, Collected Works, 4th English Edition,
Progress Publishers, Moscow, 1974

First printing 1964
Second printing 1974

Vol. 25, pp. 323-69.

Translated from the Russian
Edited by Stephan Apresyan
and Jim Riordan


Prepared © for the Internet by David J. Romagnolo, djr@cruzio.com (June 1997)


THE IMPENDING CATASTROPHE AND HOW TO COMBAT IT

  

Famine Is Approaching .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
Complete Government Inactivity .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
Control Measures Are Known to All and Easy to Take  .   .
Nationalisation of the Banks .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
Nationalisation of the Syndicates  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
Abolition of Commercial Secrecy   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
Compulsory Association   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
Regulation of Consumption   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
Government Disruption of the Work of the Democratic
  Organisations  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
Financial Collapse and Measures to Combat It.   .   .   .   .
Can We Go Forward If We Fear to Advance Towards
  Socialism?  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
The Struggle Against Economic Chaos -- and the War  .   .
The Revolutionary Democrats and the Revolutionary
  Proletariat  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .

327
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367

NOTES



    page 437


    NOTES

      [117] The All-Russia Democratic Conference was held in Petrograd between September 14 and 22 (September 27-October 5), 1917. It was called by the Mensheviks and Socialist-Revolutionaries to stem the rising tide of the revolution. The delegates represented petty-buorgeois parties, the compromising Soviets, the trade unions, Zemstvos, commercial and industrial circles, and troop units. The Bolsheviks attended with the aim of exposing the designs of the Mensheviks and S.R.s. The conference elected a pre-parliament (Provisional Council of the Republic) through which the Mensheviks and S.R.s hoped to check the revolution and divert the country on to the track of a bourgeois parliamentary system.

    page 532

        On Lenin's proposal, the Central Committee of the Party decided that the Bolsheviks should withdraw from the pre-parliament. Only the capitulators Kamenev, Rykov and Ryazanov, who were against the Party's course for the socialist revolution, insisted on participation in the pre-parliament. The Bolsheviks exposed the treacherous activity of the pre-parliament as they trained the people for an armed uprising.    [p.331]

      [117] Kit Kitych (literally, Whale Whaleson) -- nickname of Tit Titych a rich merchant in Alexander Ostrovsky's comedy Shouldering Another's Troubles. Lenin applies the nickname to capitalist tycoons.    [p.331]

      [118] The War Industries Committees, which came into being in May 1915, were formed by Russia's big imperialist bourgeoisie to help the tsarist regime with the war. The chairman of the Central War Industries Committee was the Octobrist leader A. I. Guchkov a big capitalist. Among its members were the manufacturer A. I. Konovalov and the banker and sugar manufacturer M. I. Tereshchenko. In an effort to bring the workers under its sway and inspire them with defencist sentiments, the bourgeoisie decided to form "workers' groups" under the committees and thereby to show that "class peace' had been established between the bourgeoisie and the prolotariat of Russia. The Bolsheviks declared a boycott of the committees, and maintained it with support from the majority of the workers.
        As a result of the Bolsheviks' explanatory work, elections to the "workers' groups" took place only in 70 out of the 239 regional and local War Industries Committees, workers' representatives being elected to only 36 Committees.    [p.332]

      [119] Svobodnaya Zhizn (Free Life ) -- a newspaper with a Menshevik trend published in Petrograd from September 2-8 (15-21), 1917, instead of the suspended Novaya Zhizn.    [p.355]