MARXIST INTERNET ARCHIVE |  V. I. Lenin


V. I. Lenin

EXPLANATION OF THE LAW
ON FINES IMPOSED
ON FACTORY WORKERS

Written in autumn 1896
First published in
pamphlet form
St. Petyersburg, 1895

Published according to
the 1895 edition checked
with the 1897 edition
 

From V. I. Lenin, Collected Works, 4th English Edition,
Progress Publishers, Moscow, 1972

First printing 1960
Second printing 1963
Third printing 1972

Vol. 2, pp. 29-72.

Translated from the Russian
Edited by George Hanna


Prepared © for the Internet by David J. Romagnolo, djr@cruzio.com (May 1998)

EXPLANATION OF THE LAW ON FINES IMPOSED ON FACTORY WORKERS[19]


29

I
II
 
III
IV
V
VI
 
VII
  VIII

What Are Fines?  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
How Were Fines Imposed Formerly and What Gave Rise to the New Legislation on Fines? .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
On What Grounds May the Factory Owner Impose Fines?
How Big May Fines Be?  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
What Is the Procedure for Imposing Fines? .  .   .   .   .
What, According to the Law, Should the Fines Be Spent On? .  .   .  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
Do the Fine Laws Apply to All Workers? .  .   .   .   .   .
Conclusion  .   .   .  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .

33
 
35
40
47
50
 
55
66
69

NOTES



    page 540


    NOTES

      [19] The pamphlet Explanation of the Law on Fines imposed on Factory Workers was written by Lenin in the autumn of 1895. It was printed in 3,000 copies in December of that year at the Lahta Press

    page 541

    in St. Petersburg. This printshop was an illegal one belonging to the Narodnaya Volya group, which at that time had established relations with the St. Petersburg League of Struggle for the Emancipation of the Working Class, and printed the latter's publications. The original of the pamphlet was burned, like all others, after being set up in type.
        For purposes of secrecy fictitious information was printed on the cover. For example, it was stated that the pamphlet was published by A. Y. Vasilyev's book warebouse in Kherson, that it was printed at K. N. Snbbotin's Press, Ekaterinoslav St., on premises belonging to a certain Kalinin; that it was on sale in all bookshops in Moscow and St. Petersburg. The title-page contained the inscription: "Permitted by the Censor. Kherson, November 14, 1895." In 1897 the pamphlet was re-issued in Geneva by the League of Russian Social-Democrats Abroad.
        It had a wide circulation, as is shown by the fact that according to reports of the Police Department, copies of it were found in the years 1895-1905 during searches and arrests in St. Petersburg, Kiev, Yaroslavl, Ivanovo-Voznesensk, Kazan, Sormovo, Nizhni Novgorod, Orekhovo-Zuyevo, Saratov, Krasnoyarsk, Perm, and other Russian towns.    [pág. 29]

      [20] Novoye Vremya (New Times ) -- a daily newspaper that appeared in St. Petersburg from 1868 to 1917. It belonged to different publishers at different times and repeatedly changed its political line. At first it was moderately liberal, but in 1876, when A. S. Suvorin began to publish it, it became an organ of reactionary circles among the aristocracy and bureaucracy. From 1905 it became an organ of the Black Hundreds. Following the February bourgeois-democratic revolution in 1917, it gave the fullest support to the bourgeois Provisional Government's counter-revolutionary policy and conducted a furious campaign of slander against the Bolsheviks. It was closed down by the Revolutionary Military Committee of the Petrograd Soviet on October 26 (November 8, new style), in 1917. Lenin called Novoye Vremya a typical example of the venal press.    [pág. 37]

      [21] Moskovskiye Vedomosh (Moscow Recorder ) -- one of the oldest Russian newspapers, originally issued (in 1756) as a small sheet by Moscow University. In the 1860s its line became monarchist-nationalist, reflecting the views of the most reactionary sections of the landlords and the clergy. In 1905 it became one of the leading papers of the Black Hundreds, and continued to appear until the October Revolution in 1917.    [pág. 37]

      [22] Instructions to Factory Inspectorate Officials. These contained a list of the duties of factory inspectors. Endorsed by the Minister of Finance S. Y. Witte, they were published in June 1894.    [pág. 51]

    page 542

      [23] Council of State -- a legislative-consultative body in tsarist Russia, whose members were appointed by the tsar. It consisted in the main of big landowners and tsarist dignitaries.    [pág. 51]

      [24] Ostsee gubernias -- the name given in tsarist Russia to Estland, Courland and Lifland gubernias of the Baltic region. They now constitute the territory of the Latvian and Estonian Soviet Socialist Republics.    [pág. 67]