Antonio Gramsci 1891-1937

Antonio Gramsci Archive

An Antonio Gramsci Reader

gramsci

selected writings,
1916-1935
Edited by David Forgacs
Schocken Books New York


Published in the United States by Schocken Books Inc., New York. Distributed by Pantheon Books, a division of Random House, Inc., New York. This compilation originally published in Great Britain as A Gramsci Reader by Lawrence and Wishart, London, in 1988.

Translations from Selections from Prison Notebooks, © Quintin Hoare and Geoffrey Nowell-Smith, 1971; from Selections from Political Writings (1910-1920), © Lawrence and Wishart, 1977; from Selections from Political Writings (1921-1926), © Quintin Hoare, 1978; from Selections from Cultural Writings, © Lawrence and Wishart, 1985.

HTML Mark-up by Andy Blunden, December 2002.
Proofed and corrected by Kevin Goins, 2007.


Contents

Part One: Writings 1916-1926

I Socialism and Marxism 1917-1918

1 Discipline
2 The Revolution against Capital
3 Our Marx
4 Class Intransigence and Italian History
5 Utopia

II Working-Class Education and Culture

1 Socialism and Culture
2 Schools of Labour
3 Men or Machines?
4 The Popular University
5 Illiteracy
6 The Problem of the School
7 (Questions of Culture]
8 Marinetti the Revolutionary?

III Factory Councils and Socialist Democracy

1 Workers’ Democracy
2 Conquest of the State
3 To the Workshop Delegates of the Fiat Centro and Brevetti Plants
4 Unions and Councils
5 Red Sunday
6 Political Capacity
7 Those Mainly Responsible
8 Once again on the Organic Capacities of the Working Class

IV Communism 1919-24

1 The War in the Colonies
2 Workers and Peasants
3 The Livorno Congress
4 Parties and Masses
5 What the Relations Should Be Between the PCdI and the Comintern
6 [Letter to Togliatti, Terracini and Others]

V Fascist Reaction and Communist Strategy 1924-1926

1 The Crisis of the Middle Classes
2 The Italian Situtation and the Tasks of the PCdl (Lyons Theses)
3 Letter to the Central Committee of the Soviet Communist Party
4 Some Aspects of the Southern Question


Part Two: Prison Writings 1929-1935

VI Hegemony, Relations of Force, Historical Bloc

1 Structure and Superstructure [i]
2 Structure and Superstructure [ii]
3 Structure and Superstructures [iii]
4 [The Concept of ‘Historical Bloc’]
5 [Ethico-Political History]
6 [Ethico-Political History and Hegemony]
7 [Political Ideologies]
8 Ideologies
9 Validity of Ideologies
10 Analysis of Situations: Relations of Force
11 Some Theoretical and Practical Aspects of ‘Economism’ [& in The Modern Prince]
12 Observations on Certain Aspects of the Structure of Political Parties in Periods of Organic Crisis

VII The Art and Science of Politics

1 [War of Position and War of Manoeuvre]
2 War of Position and War of Manoeuvre or Frontal War
3 Transition from the War of Manoeuvre (and from Frontal Attack) to the War of Position in the Political Field as Well
4 [Internationalism and National Policy]
5 Question of the ‘Collective Man’ or ‘Social Conformism’
6 Concept of State
7 Ethical or Cultural State
8 State as Gendarme-Nightwatchman, etc.
9 The State as Veilleur de Nuit
10 Economic-Corporate Phase of the State
11 Statolatry
12 [The Political Party as Modern ‘Prince’]
13 Fetishism

VIII Passive Revolution, Caesarism, Fascism

1 The Problem of Political Leadership in the Formation and Development of the Modern State in Italy
2 Notes on French National Life
3 The Concept of ‘Passive Revolution’ [i]
4 [The Concept of Passive Revolution ii]
5 [The Concept of Passive Revolution iii]
6 [Fascism as Passive Revolution: First Version]
7 [Fascism as Passive Revolution: Second Version]
8 Agitation and Propaganda
9 Caesarism
10 Caesarism and ‘Catastrophic’ Equilibrium of Politico-Social Forces

IX Americanism and Fordism

1 Rationalization of the Demographic Composition of Europe
2 Some Aspects of the Sexual Question
3 Financial Autarky and Industry
4 ‘Animality’ and Industrialism
5 Rationalization of Production and Work
6 Taylorism and the Mechanization of the Worker
7 [Babbitt]
8 Babbitt Again
9 Notes on American Culture

X Intellectuals and Education

1 [Intellectuals]
2 Observations on the School: In Search of the Educational Principle
3 [Intellectuals and Non-Intellectuals]

XI Philosophy, Common Sense, Language and Folklore

1 Notes for an Introduction and an Approach to the Study of Philosophy in the History of Culture
    i Some preliminary reference points
    ii Observations and critical notes on an attempt at a ‘Popular Manual of Sociology’
2 Language, Languages, Common Sense
3 [‘Knowledge’ and ‘Feeling’]
4 [The Philosophy of Praxis and ‘Intellectual and Moral Reformation’]
5 How Many Forms of Grammar Can There Be?
6 Sources of Diffusion of Linguistic Innovations in the Tradition and of a National Linguistic Conformism in the Broad National Masses
7 Historical and Normative Grammars
8 Grammar and Technique
9 Observations on Folklore

XII Popular Culture

1 Concept of ‘National-Popular’
2 Various Types of Popular Novel
3 The Operatic Conception of Life
4 Popular Literature. Operatic Taste
5 Oratory, Conversation, Culture

XIII Journalism

1 Ideological Material
2 Dilettantism and Discipline
3 [Integral Journalism]
4 Types of Periodical

XIV Art and the Struggle for a New Civilization

1 Art and the Struggle for a New Civilization
2 Art and Culture
3 Literary Criticism
4 Criteria of Literary Criticism
5 Sincerity (or Spontaneity) and Discipline
6 [‘Functional’ Literature]